Frequently Asked Questions

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Does My Child or Baby Have Autism (Autistic)?

Autism is not “one” thing. In 2013 the American Psychiatric Association merged several distinct
autism diagnoses into one, renaming it Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) to better communicate
the broad range of symptoms and levels of severity. ASD is a neurological-based disorder with
social, communication, and behavioral symptoms ranging from very mild to severe. (more)

Does My Son or Daughter Have ADHD or ADD?

Taken together, Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD) and Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) are the most common neuro-behavioral disorders diagnosed in children. Nearly all children have times when their attention or behavior are disruptive or out of control. Normal tantrums or outbursts are not necessarily ADHD-related. An ADHD diagnosis is possible when a child’s behavior or distractions interfere with their ability to function in normal day-to-day activities and social interactions. (more)

Is My Toddler or Child Overweight (Fat)?

Kids come in a wide variety of body types naturally. As parents, we want our children to be happy and healthy in every way, and that includes being underweight or overweight. Being a little overweight is not likely to be a health issue. Being overweight becomes a problem when the amount of excess weight has the potential to increase health risks for the child, now or in the future. This is what we call Childhood Obesity. (more)

Does My Child Have Dyslexia / Is My Child Dyslexic?

Dyslexia is described as a learning disability that relates to speech sounds and how the brain relates them to written words. Parents who have a child diagnosed with dyslexia can be understandably very concerned. But while it’s true that dyslexic children can have greater difficulty reading, studying, and learning in conventional school environments, there are many programs and tools available to help. (more)

Office Documents

These links will allow you access to printable office forms. Note these forms should not be emailed back to the office. If you prefer, you can fax these to us at 770-772-6099, or bring them with you on your next visit."